PCOS

If you have a love/hate relationship with hormonal birth control, you are not alone. Whether you started birth control to regain control of your...

Whitney Welsh •Nov 18, 2022

PCOS

The world of fertility meds can be a confusing and overwhelming place. With so many different treatment protocols and pharmaceutical options available, it’s vital...

Lindsey Williams •Nov 16, 2022

Reproductive diseases like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), interstitial cystitis, and endometriosis can make family planning more challenging. Another lesser-known condition many women face is...

Taneia Surles •Oct 27, 2022

If you have been diagnosed with PCOS, it’s likely you have also heard some diet advice (perhaps unsolicited). PCOS can not only be painful...

Whitney Welsh •Sep 28, 2022

As someone who has spent the better part of 5 years trying to conceive with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), I am here to tell you that you are not alone if you are frustrated with your body. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, commonly referred to as PCOS, affects 6-12% of U.S. women of reproductive age. Due to excessive production of hormones called androgens, women with PCOS may experience a variety of symptoms, including ovarian cysts, irregular or absent menstrual cycles, acne, obesity, insulin resistance, excessive facial hair growth, and/or male-pattern hair loss. For me, my PCOS manifests itself...

Kristyn Hodgdon •Sep 20, 2022

Sponsored by Organon. Photo not of a real patient. Kristyn Hodgdon is an IVF mom, proud fertility advocate, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Rescripted. This article is the opinion of the author and reflects the author's views. The author is not a healthcare professional.  When it comes to trying – and struggling – to get pregnant, knowing what to be aware of and realizing ongoing symptoms in your body might be indicative of a larger diagnosis can be incredibly helpful. Have you or your doctor ever noticed any of the following symptoms? ·       Ovarian cysts...

Kristyn Hodgdon •Sep 7, 2022

The aftermath of miscarriage is a part of the recovery that is often overlooked. Women are told to expect a heavy period and to bleed for a few weeks, but often they are not given the tools necessary for coping with the fact that they have lost a child. When my reproductive endocrinologist told me that I was miscarrying our first pregnancy, all he said was that I should expect to have a really bad day and that I could try again after my first period. There was no advice on how to get through the...

Arden Cartrette •Sep 5, 2022

If you’re about to begin undergoing fertility treatments, there’s a chance you’ve asked yourself “does IUI even work?”. Maybe you’ve heard multiple success stories from IVF patients, but few from those who have conceived via IUI — or maybe you’re simply discouraged by the relatively low success rates (we’ll get into those below, but spoiler alert: IUI is unsuccessful more often than not).  But IUI can work — it worked for me in 2018, when I conceived my twins. Though I had a lot of doubts going into the procedure, it ended up being the right choice...

Zara Hanawalt •Jul 5, 2022

I’m currently in the two-week wait following my fourth frozen embryo transfer, and honestly, it feels like the stakes couldn’t be any higher for us than they are right now. On one hand, I’m hopeful: we did a whole slew of testing following our last failed transfer, and my doctor changed up my protocol due to the results of my ERA (Endometrial Receptivity Analysis).  On the other hand, I’m terrified. In the past year, I have had an early miscarriage, moved forward with PGT-A testing, and grieved two failed transfers with euploid (normal) embryos. Since I’ve...

Kristyn Hodgdon •Jun 27, 2022

I was 28 when I began trying (and trying and trying) to conceive. As a journalist covering fertility and prenatal health, I had all this information right at my fingertips, but nothing could prepare me for the frustrating, isolating reality of facing fertility challenges before age 30. At the time, my friends all fell squarely into one of two camps: Either they’d gotten pregnant immediately — often before even transitioning from “not not trying” to trying in earnest — or, they were actively avoiding pregnancy. None of them had drawers devoted to ovulation trackers in their...

Zara Hanawalt •Jun 21, 2022
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